September 26, 2017

Category Archives: Health Journal

Podcast: ‘What The Health?’ Hurricane Harvey And Health Costs

Podcast: ‘What The Health?’ Hurricane Harvey And Health Costs

Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News, Joanne Kenen of Politico, and Margot Sanger-Katz of The New York Times discuss the potential health impact of Hurricane Harvey on the Texas Gulf Coast, and what impact the relief effort in Washington could have on an already jampacked September agenda. Also this week: an interview with Elisabeth Rosenthal about why medical care costs so much. Plus, for “extra credit,” the panelists recommend their favorite health stories of the week they think you should read, too. Julie Rovner: The Washington Post: “Some say people on disability just need to get back to work. It’s not that easy,” by Terrence …Continue Reading

St. Kitts Launches Probe Of Herpes Vaccine Tests On U.S. Patients

St. Kitts Launches Probe Of Herpes Vaccine Tests On U.S. Patients

The government of St. Kitts and Nevis has launched an investigation into the clinical trial for a herpes vaccine by an American company because it said its officials were not notified about the experiments. The vaccine research has sparked controversy because the lead investigator, a professor with Southern Illinois University, and the U.S. company he co-founded did not rely on traditional U.S. safety oversight while testing the vaccine last year on mostly American participants on the Caribbean island of St. Kitts. The trial received financial backing from a former Hollywood filmmaker who has asserted the vaccine was highly successful in stopping herpes outbreaks. Since then, a group of investors, including Donald Trump supporter Peter Thiel, have backed the ongoing vaccine…Continue Reading

Calif. Hospitals Make Inroads On Infection Rates But Challenges Remain

(c) Kaiser Health News – Read entire story here.

WOMEN’S BRAIN HEALTH SERIES: Meet Myriam Marquez: Lawyer, Fierce Advocate Living with Alzheimer’s

WOMEN’S BRAIN HEALTH SERIES: Meet Myriam Marquez: Lawyer, Fierce Advocate Living with Alzheimer’s

In the next few decades, the number of persons over the age of 65 with Alzheimer’s disease is set to nearly triple from an estimated 5.2 people today to 13.8 million in 2050. It is an expensive disease–total payments for health and long-term care for all individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias in 2016 are estimated to be $236 billion, of which $46 billion will be out of pocket. These numbers will continue to challenge our country’s resources, health and long-term care systems, and families for years to come. However, as researchers search for a cure, we must also meet the challenge of living well with Alzheimer’s—and we must start by …Continue Reading

WOMEN’S BRAIN HEALTH SERIES: Diverse Women in Clinical Trials—We Can Make a Difference

WOMEN’S BRAIN HEALTH SERIES: Diverse Women in Clinical Trials—We Can Make a Difference

Today we wrap up our Disruptive Women WOMEN’S BRAIN HEALTH SERIES with a post by FDA’s Marsha Henderson.  Clinical research will play an important role in helping to advance our understanding of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia in women. During my 20+ year career at the FDA Office of Women’s Health, I have seen improvements in women’s overall participation in clinical trials and advancements in clinical research design and recruitment. However, I know that despite this progress our work is not done. Many women are still uninformed about clinical trials or they simply haven’t been asked to participate. My office launched the Diverse Women in Clinical Trials Initiative to help change this reality. Our initiative strives to promote the participation of …Continue Reading

Some States Complain Medicaid Rule To Assess Enrollees’ Access To Care Is Too Burdensome

Some States Complain Medicaid Rule To Assess Enrollees’ Access To Care Is Too Burdensome

(c) Kaiser Health News – Read entire story here.

State Highlights: Conn. Hospitals Show Weaker Financial Performance In 2015; Ohio OKs Bill To Address Infant Mortality Rate

State Highlights: Conn. Hospitals Show Weaker Financial Performance In 2015; Ohio OKs Bill To Address Infant Mortality Rate

(c) Kaiser Health News – Read entire story here.

Most Hospitals Offer Patients Electronic Access to Medical Records

This post was originally published on http://www.healthpopuli.com/ on September 14, 2016. The number of hospitals offering patients electronic access to their health information grew seven times between 2013 and 2015. Electronic health records access has gone mainstream in America, according to the latest findings by The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC-HIT). The data are detailed in Electronic Capabilities for Patient Engagement among U.S. Non-Federal Acute Care Hospitals: 2012-2015, an ONC Data Brief. Two in three U.S. patients can now view, download, and transmit their personal health information, shown in the bar chart. This hockey-stick growth, from 10% in 2013 to 69% in 2015, results…Continue Reading

Launching the Disruptive Women Series on Brain Health: “The Brain is Wider than the Sky”

Launching the Disruptive Women Series on Brain Health: “The Brain is Wider than the Sky”

This week we launch our series on Women’s Brain Health.  The statistics are sobering, the diseases cruel, and the percentage of women disproportionately affected by dementia, Alzheimer’s Disease, and other neurologic disorders are staggering and growing.  So too, the number of women who become caregivers– their physical, emotional and financial health draining as a result.  At the same time, the number of remarkable women contributing to the research pipeline and policy apparatus is breathtaking.  Over the next two weeks, we will introduce you to the exciting work these women are contributing to the field.  But before we dive into the turbulent waters, I am …Continue Reading

Community Health System Explores Options To Shed More Hospitals

Community Health System Explores Options To Shed More Hospitals

(c) Kaiser Health News – Read entire story here.